techtiptom

Tech Tip Tom, formerly of WIBC 93.1FM and wibc.com

Month: March, 2013

Effects of temperature on Computers

Frozen_PC

Effects of temperature on Computers

How devastating are extreme temperatures on computers? If a computer were exposed to temperatures near zero degrees, would there be an effect on its internal parts (i.e. Motherboard, hard drive, etc.)

Computers generate lots of heat and are also very sensitive to humidity. Generally computer rooms are kept air conditioned in the low 60s.  Extremes of any temperature are not friendly to any type of circuitry. Extreme cold could make circuits brittle and prone to cracking.

Computers (and electronics equipment in general) are much more tolerant of cold than heat. They may be able to deal with zero degrees. Though as was pointed out above,  the components would be more fragile and susceptible to cracking. The main problem would be condensation. If the computer were not designed with that environment in mind you would most likely encounter some problems. Some such as computer modules in cars and military computers do quite well in the cold. I wouldn’t expose my laptop to zero degrees and turn it on.

A List of Run Commands for Windows 7

windows7

A List of Run Commands for Windows 7

Windows logo key + R

Administrative Tools

Administrative Tools = control admintools
Authorization Manager = azman.msc
Component Services = dcomcnfg
Certificate Manager = certmgr.msc
Direct X Troubleshooter = dxdiag
Display Languages = lpksetup
ODBC Data Source Administrator = odbcad32
File Signature Verification Tool = sigverif
Group Policy Editor = gpedit.msc
Add Hardware Wizard = hdwwiz.cpl
iSCSI Initiator = iscsicpl
Iexpress Wizard = iexpress
Local Security Settings = secpol.msc
Microsoft Support Diagnostic Tool = msdt
Microsoft Management Console = mmc
Print management = printmanagement.msc
Printer User Interface = printui
Problems Steps Recorder = psr
People Near Me = p2phost
Registry Editor = regedit or regedt32
Resoure Monitor = resmon
System Configuration Utility = msconfig
Resultant Set of Policy = rsop.msc
SQL Server Client Configuration = cliconfg
Task Manager = taskmgr
Trusted Platform Module = tpm.msc
TPM Security Hardware = TpmInit
Windows Remote Assistance = msra
Windows Share Folder Creation Wizard = shrpubw
Windows Standalong Update Manager = wusa
Windows System Security Tool = syskey
Windows Script Host Settings = wscript
Windows Version = winver
Windows Firewall with Advanced Security = wf.msc
Windows Memory Diagnostic = MdSched
Windows Malicious Removal Tool = mrt

Computer Management

Computer Management = compmgmt.msc or CompMgmtLauncher
Task Scheduler = control schedtasks
Event Viewer = eventvwr.msc
Shared Folders/MMC = fsmgmt.msc
Local Users and Groups = lusrmgr.msc
Performance Monitor = perfmon.msc
Device Manager = devmgmt.msc
Disk Management = diskmgmt.msc
Services = services.msc
Windows Management Infrastructure = wmimgmt.msc

Conrtol Panel

Control Panel = control
Action Center= wscui.cpl
Autoplay = control.exe /name Microsoft.autoplay
Backup and Restore = sdclt
Create a System Repair disc = recdisc
BDE Administrator = bdeadmin.cpl
Color Management = colorcpl
Credential Manager = control.exe /name Microsoft.CredentialManager
Credential Manager Stored User Names and Passwords = credwiz
Date and Time Properties = timedate.cpl
Default Programs = control.exe /name Microsoft.DefaultPrograms
Set Program Access and Computer Defaults = control appwiz.cpl,,3 or ComputerDefaults
Devices and Printers = control printers
Devices and Printers Add a Device = DevicePairingWizard
Display = dpiscaling
Screen Resolution = desk.cpl
Display Color Calibration = dccw
Cleartype Text Tuner = cttune
Folders Options = control folders
Fonts = control fonts
Getting Started = GettingStarted
HomeGroup = control.exe /name Microsoft.HomeGroup
Indexing Options = control.exe /name Microsoft.IndexingOptions
Internet Properties = inetcpl.cpl
Keyboard = control keyboard
Location and Other Sensors = control.exe /name Microsoft.LocationandOtherSensors
Location Notifications = LocationNotifications
Mouse = control mouse or main.cpl
Network and Sharing Center = control.exe /name Microsoft.NetworkandSharingCenter
Network Connections = control netconnections or ncpa.cpl
Notification Area Icons = control.exe /name Microsoft.NotificationAreaIcons
Parental Controls = control.exe /name Microsoft.ParentalControls
Performance Information = control.exe /name Microsoft.PerformanceInformationandTools
Personalization = control desktop
Windows Color and Appearance = control color
Phone and Modem Options = telephon.cpl
Power Configuration = powercfg.cpl
Programs and Features = appwiz.cpl or control appwiz.cpl
Optional Features Manager = optionalfeatures or control appwiz.cpl,,2
Recovery = control.exe /name Microsoft.Recovery
Regional and Language = intl.cpl
RemoteApp = control.exe /name Microsoft.RemoteAppandDesktopConnections
Sound = mmsys.cpl
Volume Mixer = sndvol
System Properties = sysdm.cpl or Windows logo key + Pause/Break
SP ComputerName Tab = SystemPropertiesComputerName
SP Hardware Tab = SystemPropertiesHardware
SP Advanced Tab = SystemPropertiesAdvanced
SP Performance = SystemPropertiesPerformance
SP Data Execution Prevention = SystemPropertiesDataExecutionPrevention
SP Protection Tab = SystemPropertiesProtection
SP Remote Tab = SystemPropertiesRemote
Windows Activation = slui
Windows Activation Phone Numbers = slui 4
Taskbar and Start Menu = control.exe /name Microsoft.TaskbarandStartMenu
Troubleshooting = control.exe /name Microsoft.Troubleshooting
User Accounts = control.exe /name Microsoft.UserAccounts
User Account Control Settings = UserAccountControlSettings
User Accounts Windows 2000/domain version = netplwiz or control userpasswords2
Encryption File System = rekeywiz
Windows Anytime Upgrade = WindowsAnytimeUpgradeui
Windows Anytime Upgrade Results = WindowsAnytimeUpgradeResults
Windows CardSpace = control.exe /name Microsoft.cardspace
Windows Firewall = firewall.cpl
WindowsSideshow = control.exe /name Microsoft.WindowsSideshow
Windows Update App Manager = wuapp

Accessories

Calculator = calc
Command Prompt = cmd
Connect to a Network Projector = NetProj
Presentation Settings = PresentationSettings
Connect to a Projector = displayswitch or Windows logo key + P
Notepad = notepad
Microsoft Paint = mspaint.exe
Remote Desktop Connection = mstsc
Run = Windows logo key + R
Snipping Tool = snippingtool
Sound Recorder = soundrecorder
Sticky Note = StikyNot
Sync Center = mobsync
Windows Mobility Center (Only on Laptops) = mblctr or Windows logo key + X
Windows Explorer = explorer or Windows logo key + E
Wordpad = write
Ease of Access Center = utilman or Windows logo key + U
Magnifier = magnify
Narrator = Narrator
On Screen Keyboard = osk
Private Character Editor = eudcedit
Character Map = charmap
Ditilizer Calibration Tool = tabcal
Disk Cleanup Utility = cleanmgr
Defragment User Interface = dfrgui
Internet Explorer = iexplore
Rating System = ticrf
Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) = iexplore -extoff
Internet Explorer (No Home) = iexplore about:blank
Phone Dialer = dialer
Printer Migration = PrintBrmUi
System Information = msinfo32
System Restore = rstrui
Windows Easy Transfer = migwiz
Windows Media Player = wmplayer
Windows Media Player DVD Player = dvdplay
Windows Fax and Scan Cover Page Editor = fxscover
Windows Fax and Scan = wfs
Windows Image Acquisition = wiaacmgr
Windows PowerShell ISE = powershell_ise
Windows PowerShell = powershell
XPS Viewer = xpsrchvw

Open Documents folder = documents
Open Pictures folder = pictures
Open Music folder = music
Open Videos folder = videos
Open Downloads folder = downloads
Open Favorites folder = favorites
Open Recent folder = recent
Logs out of Windows = logoff
Locks User Account = Windows logo Key + L

Douglas Adams Quotes

Douglas_adams_portraitDouglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English writer, humorist, and dramatist. He is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which started life in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a “trilogy” of five books that sold more than 15 million copies in his lifetime, a television series, several stage plays, comics, a computer game, and in 2005 a feature film.

• I’m always very sympathetic when I hear people complaining that all they ever get on television or radio chat shows is authors honking on about their latest book. It does, on the other hand, get us out of the house and spare our families the trial of hearing us honking on about our latest book.

• All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.

• Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works. Anything that’s invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it. Anything invented after you’re thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

• We are stuck with technology when what we really want is just stuff that works.

• Anything that happens, happens. Anything that, in happening, causes something else to happen, causes something else to happen. Anything that, in happening, causes itself to happen again, happens again. It doesn’t necessarily do it in chronological order, though.

• Solutions nearly always come from the direction you least expect, which means there’s no point trying to look in that direction because it won’t be coming from there.

• I think a nerd is a person who uses the telephone to talk to other people about telephones. And a computer nerd therefore is somebody who uses a computer in order to use a computer.

• Imagine a puddle waking up one morning and thinking, “This is an interesting world I find myself in — an interesting hole I find myself in — fits me rather neatly, doesn’t it? In fact it fits me staggeringly well, must have been made to have me in it!” This is such a powerful idea that as the sun rises in the sky and the air heats up and as, gradually, the puddle gets smaller and smaller, it’s still frantically hanging on to the notion that everything’s going to be alright, because this world was meant to have him in it, was built to have him in it; so the moment he disappears catches him rather by surprise. I think this may be something we need to be on the watch out for. We all know that at some point in the future the Universe will come to an end and at some other point, considerably in advance from that but still not immediately pressing, the sun will explode. We feel there’s plenty of time to worry about that, but on the other hand that’s a very dangerous thing to say.

• A learning experience is one of those things that say, “You know that thing you just did? Don’t do that.”

• We don’t have to save the world. The world is big enough to look after itself. What we have to be concerned about is whether or not the world we live in will be capable of sustaining us in it.

• If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a nonworking cat. Life is a level of complexity that almost lies outside our vision; it is so far beyond anything we have any means of understanding that we just think of it as a different class of object, a different class of matter; ‘life’, something that had a mysterious essence about it, was God given, and that’s the only explanation we had. The bombshell comes in 1859 when Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. It takes a long time before we really get to grips with this and begin to understand it, because not only does it seem incredible and thoroughly demeaning to us, but it’s yet another shock to our system to discover that not only are we not the center of the Universe and we’re not made by anything, but we started out as some kind of slime and got to where we are via being a monkey. It just doesn’t read well.

• Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so.

• The world is a thing of utter inordinate complexity and richness and strangeness that is absolutely awesome. I mean the idea that such complexity can arise not only out of such simplicity, but probably absolutely out of nothing, is the most fabulous extraordinary idea. And once you get some kind of inkling of how that might have happened, it’s just wonderful. And … the opportunity to spend 70 or 80 years of your life in such a universe is time well spent as far as I am concerned.

• A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

• One of the major difficulties Trillian experienced in her relationship with Zaphod was learning to distinguish between him pretending to be stupid just to get people off their guard, pretending to be stupid because he couldn’t be bothered to think and wanted someone else to do it for him, pretending to be outrageously stupid to hide the fact that he actually didn’t understand what was going on, and really being genuinely stupid.

• “Sir Isaac Newton, renowned inventor of the milled-edge coin and the catflap!”
“The what?” said Richard.
“The catflap! A device of the utmost cunning, perspicuity and invention. It is a door within a door, you see, a …”
“Yes,” said Richard, “there was also the small matter of gravity.”
“Gravity,” said Dirk with a slightly dismissed shrug, “yes, there was that as well, I suppose. Though that, of course, was merely a discovery. It was there to be discovered.” …
“You see?” he said dropping his cigarette butt, “They even keep it on at weekends. Someone was bound to notice sooner or later. But the catflap … ah, there is a very different matter. Invention, pure creative invention. It is a door within a door, you see.”

• It can hardly be a coincidence that no language on earth has ever produced the expression “As pretty as an airport.” Airports are ugly. Some are very ugly. Some attain a degree of ugliness that can only be the result of a special effort. This ugliness arises because airports are full of people who are tired, cross, and have just discovered that their luggage has landed in Murmansk (Murmansk airport is the only exception of this otherwise infallible rule), and architects have on the whole tried to reflect this in their designs.

• The impossible often has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbable lacks.

• She passed the time quietly in a world of her own in which she was surrounded as far as the eye could see with old cabin trunks full of past memories in which she rummaged with great curiosity, and sometimes bewilderment. Or, at least, about a tenth of the cabin trunks were full of vivid, and often painful or uncomfortable memories of her past life; the other nine-tenths were full of penguins, which surprised her. Insofar as she recognized at all that she was dreaming, she realized that she must be exploring her own subconscious mind. She had heard it said that humans are supposed only to use about a tenth of their brains, and that no one was very clear what the other nine-tenths were for, but she had certainly never heard it suggested that they were used for storing penguins.

• The chances of finding out what’s really going on in the universe are so remote, the only thing to do is hang the sense of it and keep yourself occupied.

• Generally, old media don’t die. They just have to grow old gracefully. Guess what, we still have stone masons. They haven’t been the primary purveyors of the written word for a while now of course, but they still have a role because you wouldn’t want a TV screen on your headstone.

• Any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through, and still know where his towel is, is clearly a man to be reckoned with.

• The first non-absolute number is the number of people for whom the table is reserved. This will vary during the course of the first three telephone calls to the restaurant, and then bear no apparent relation to the number of people who actually turn up…
The second non-absolute number is the given time of arrival, which is now known to be one of those most bizarre of mathematical concepts, a recipriversexlusion, a number whose existence can only be defined as being anything other than itself. In other words, the given time of arrival is the one moment of time at which it is impossible that any member of the party will arrive.

• There is an art, it says, or rather, a knack to flying. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss. … Clearly, it is this second part, the missing, which presents the difficulties.

• If we think that the world is here for us we will continue to destroy it the way we have been destroying it, because we think we can do no harm.

And finally,

• Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undo-able, let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all.

Top 20 2013 Billionaires

bag_of_money

In case you missed it, here are the top 20 billionaires in the world, according to Forbes magazine…

Top 20 2013 Billionaires:

Name:                                  Country:              Wealth Source:                 Net worth:

Carlos Slim                         Mexico                 Telecom                            $73 billion

Bill Gates                             US                        Microsoft                            $67 billion

Amancio Ortega                 Spain                   Zara                                    $57 billion

Warren Buffett                     US                        Berkshire Hathaway        $53.5 billion

Larry Ellison                        US                        Oracle                                 $43 billion

Charles Koch                      US                        Varied                                 $34 billion

David Koch                          US                        Varied                                  $34 billion

Li Ka-shing                          China                  Varied                                  $31 billion

Liliane Bettencourt             France                 L’Oreal                                $30 billion

Bernard Arnault                   France                Louis Vuitton                      $29 billion

Christy Walton                     US                       Wal-Mart                              $28.2 billion

Stefan Persson                   Sweden              H&M                                     $28 billion

Michael Bloomberg            US                       Bloomberg                         $27 billion

Jim Walton                           US                       Wal-Mart                              $26.7 billion

Sheldon Adelson                US                      Casinos                               $26.5 billion

Alice Walton                         US                      Wal-Mart                               $26.3 billion

S. Robson Walton              US                       Wal-Mart                               $26.1 billion

Karl Albrecht                        Germany            Aldi Sud                                 $26 billion

Jeff Bezos                             US                      Amazon.com                         $25.2 billion

Larry Page                            US                      Google                                   $23 billion